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ok i got some new a arms and i need some advise on the allignment part is it better for them to lean in and about how much if so............ any input would help i know there is an article in DW but its not helping very much
 

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could u make ur self a little more clearer, like ur toe-in and out or just the caster and camber, if ur riding mx people tend to ahve there toe-in at about 5 degrees, thats why u c so many like this= / \
 

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THERE ARE DIFFERENT SETTINGS FOPR DIFFERENT APPLICATIONS. 3 DEGREES CAMBER, 3 DEGREES CASTOR AND 1/4" TOE IN IS FAIRLY COMMON...THERE WAS AN ARTICLE ON HERE SOMEWHERE
 

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Originally posted by rrussell@Jun 24 2004, 09:22 AM
THERE ARE DIFFERENT SETTINGS FOPR DIFFERENT APPLICATIONS. 3 DEGREES CAMBER, 3 DEGREES CASTOR AND 1/4" TOE IN IS FAIRLY COMMON...THERE WAS AN ARTICLE ON HERE SOMEWHERE
:stupid i run around 4* of camber and 1/4 on the toe.... if u really want to get technical, call Rudy at DFR at (480) 664-9860.... he started trying to explain it to me one day and it was like chinese to me :what ....... i know the basics, but he can tell u everything u need to know :yfz
 

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could somebody explain to me, like Im a 3rd grader, what all the terms mean and how to adjust them? Thx.
 

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Caster - it's the distance between the upper ball joint and lower, as viewed from a vertical plane. Stand directly above your upper ball joint and look straight down. If the upper BJ is rearward of the lower BJ, then you have positive caster. If the upper is forward of the lower, its negative caster. You will almost always want positive caster, typically 5-6 degrees. The more positive caster you have the steadier the ride, but the slower you'll turn. MX guys will run 3-4 degrees of caster so their ride is jumpier, but they turn on a dime. Duners are 5-6 degrees. Adjustment - if your a arms are adjustable, you will adjust the heim bolts which connect the a arms to the frame of the bike. Loosen and screw in or out to get the caster you need. if there are no heim bolts, then your arms are not caster adj. so don't worry about this.

Camber - its the lean of the tires: / \ is negative camber, \ / is positive camber. Typical settings are 2-3 degrees. Adjustment: take the carrier off the upper ball joint. Loosen the upper ball joint and screw in or out to get the adjustment you need. You can also adjust the lower ball joint as well if needed.

Toe - comparison of the leading edge of your tire to the most rearward point on the tire. Toe in is where the front of the tire is slightly closer together than the back hald. typical setting is 1/4" toe in - the front being closer than the rear. Adjustment: take a tape measure and measure from ridge to ridge on your sand tires the front measurement, then the back. adjust the tie rods (metal bars toward the rear of your arms, unscrew and spin the tie rod to adjust) so your front measurement is 1/4" smaller than your rear measurement.

Feel free to PM me with any other questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks
 

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Good post but I have a question. I have the Burgard Premium a-arms and they are "camber caster adjustable". Burgard a-arms But I only have the heim joint adjustments on the upper a-arms for caster. The ball joints are welded to the lower a-arms. Does this mean they are not camber adjustable?
 

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They are camber adjustable.

If the bottom heim joints stay in place, and only the upper moves, you're still changing the relationship between the two ball joints - either increasing or decreasing caster. You don't need to be able to move both upper and lower joints to affect a change in angle between the two.

Same with Camber - as long as you can move the top ball joint in and out, you're changing the angle of lean (camber).
 

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Caster - it's the distance between the upper ball joint and lower, as viewed from a vertical plane. Stand directly above your upper ball joint and look straight down. If the upper BJ is rearward of the lower BJ, then you have positive caster. If the upper is forward of the lower, its negative caster. You will almost always want positive caster, typically 5-6 degrees. The more positive caster you have the steadier the ride, but the slower you'll turn. MX guys will run 3-4 degrees of caster so their ride is jumpier, but they turn on a dime. Duners are 5-6 degrees. Adjustment - if your a arms are adjustable, you will adjust the heim bolts which connect the a arms to the frame of the bike. Loosen and screw in or out to get the caster you need. if there are no heim bolts, then your arms are not caster adj. so don't worry about this.

Camber - its the lean of the tires: / \ is negative camber, \ / is positive camber. Typical settings are 2-3 degrees. Adjustment: take the carrier off the upper ball joint. Loosen the upper ball joint and screw in or out to get the adjustment you need. You can also adjust the lower ball joint as well if needed.

Toe - comparison of the leading edge of your tire to the most rearward point on the tire. Toe in is where the front of the tire is slightly closer together than the back hald. typical setting is 1/4" toe in - the front being closer than the rear. Adjustment: take a tape measure and measure from ridge to ridge on your sand tires the front measurement, then the back. adjust the tie rods (metal bars toward the rear of your arms, unscrew and spin the tie rod to adjust) so your front measurement is 1/4" smaller than your rear measurement.

Feel free to PM me with any other questions.
Best answer on the internet...
 
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