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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the difference of a Single Front line or Dual front lines.

??Single - Is this the stock configuration of one line from the Rez to a T that splits to the front L/R rotors?

??Dual - Two lines from the Rez all the way down?

Or am I completely confused?

What is are the Pros/Cons of either?

Thanks in advance.

ORA.
 

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The way it was explained to me, was using two separate hose's that run all the way down to the calipers. Provides equal pressure to each caliper. Go figure.........
 

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offroadace, you are correct - but i do not know the pros/cons of each.

With 1 wire going down to the 'T' then splitting, IMO looks better and would be easier to mess with.
 

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The only con to dual lines is that you use more brake fluid yet the pro is that you get one line to each caliper which equals better stopping power and the t-block setup acutally splits your fluid
Hope this helps
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but with the dual line setup equaling more brake fluid, that would lead to cooler brake fluid temps. Better braking for the long haul, and less fading... :lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the replies and info.

I was figuring equal pressure and had forgotten about the heat disipation with dual lines. That makes sense and Ilike my front brakes. :D

Extra Brake fluid - I don't see it so much as a con, but I do see that the T would be easier/cleaner. I deal with dual front lines on my road bike too, been a while since I've had it running, so not much different maintaince on that.

Thanks again for the help.

ORA
 

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They'll stay cooler with more fluid. But simple hydraulics would disagree with the improved - pressure/stopping power. To achieve these trait's, one would have to change the master cyl. to a larger bore/volume. Once the fluid passes the tee and heads for the calipers, the master cyl. plays more of a roll than anything. The calipers and their respective bores will only handle a given amount of fluid. Hope that makes sense.

Sound like a damn professor. :lol

While were on the subject. Does anyone know where to get a 1"-2" longer stainless front brake hose? The one from the master cyl. to the tee. After installing my stem, the stock hose is about as far as I'd like to see it. Would rather put one on a bit longer. Thanks
 

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vorra65, so in your thought out opion that makes sense(you only have as much fluid as your caliper) which way would you go? the 2 all the way down, or 1 into 2?
 

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I suppose in the end it all comes down to aesthetic's. That is , if you don't change the master cyl. or the calipers. I myself, will continue to look for a longer primary hose, between the master and the tee to accomodate my needs. I know alot of guys have gone to the two separate hose setup. But like I said, that master cyl. can only push so much volume. I do however, see the advantage for cooling purposes. More fluid, and more surface area to cool. But I'm not real convinced that a stainless jacketed rubber hose would cool any faster than a steel supply line and two shorter rubber hoses. Hey I'm a parts guy, WTF do I know. I can say however, the braking system on the YFZ -in it's stock form. Is far superior to any other quad I have ridden. :rock
 

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I'm reasonably sure there's not much difference whether your fluid splits at the T-box or whether it splits at the master cylinder by doubling up the banjo fittings.

I would tend to think the rigid tubing expands less than even the best braided flexible lines. If someone has a brake line design that uses more rigid tubing and less of the braided lines, I would think you'd have the best brake feel possible.
 
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